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Tip of the Week 5/16:
 

Quick Restarts


Lacrosse is known as “the fastest sport on 2 feet”. And I, for one, completely agree. The pace of the game gets faster and faster at every level you officiate. 


Quick restarts are something that keeps the game moving smoothly, however, if not used at the appropriate time or in the right way, it can cause some issues with game management and get a coach fired up. 


As we all know, every restart requires 5 yards from the ball carrier (both opponents and TEAMMATES!). Quick restarts usually work best:

  1. Shot on endline
  2. After a technical foul (push, hold, illegal procedure, ect.)

When Team A pushes Team B, that is a time a quick restart can be used as soon as Team B picks up the ball. The attack will be moving away and should be more than 5 yards away. 


When Team A takes a shot that goes off goal and is closest, as soon as they pick up the ball, start play.


Please keep in mind that this should be used only when the offended team can gain an advantage by quickly starting play.

 
--
Joe Perez
IHSA Football (R), Lacrosse (R) and Soccer (C) official (53117)
USA Hockey Level IV official/Hockey Canada Level VI official
USSF Grade 7 official and Assessor
US Lacrosse COC (MCLA/NCAA) certified official

Tip of the Week 5/9:

 

Stalling/Under 2 mins in regulation play

 

Stalling is just what it sounds like - wasting time by keeping the ball away from the defense and not making an effort at goal/preventing a turnover. Stalling is one of the most inconsistently called parts of our game. Often, officials don’t call it at all or alternatively, if they do call it, they don’t call it consistently for both teams.

 

Please keep in mind that there is no official time limit for stalling. You know it when you see it, or rather, when you don’t see it. One mechanic that I find helpful is when a team has all the proper personnel (i.e. all subbing has ceased), I turn on my timer 2 times. When it has gone off 2 times, I decide if they have made an effort towards the goal. If they have, no stalling. If not, they are probably stalling and should be given 20 more seconds, then be called for stalling.

 

Once a stall warning has been applied, only 3 things can take it off:

 

1)  A goal

2)  Defensive possession (not touch, POSSESSION)

3)  End of a quarter with the next quarter beginning with a face-off

 

The ball may leave the box for 2 reasons only without the offensive team being called for stalling:

 

1)  A shot that carries itself out of the box

2)  A ball that is deflected/tipped by the defense.

 

In both of those situations, the offensive team may retain possession as long as they get the ball back in the box within the 10 second timeframe required by rule.

 

Now the last 2 mins of regulation play have a similar situation. Under 2 mins, the team that has the lead must keep the ball in the box. When the ball is outside of the box when 2 mins hits, you must start your 10 second count and when they get the ball inside the box, they have to keep it in.

 

Please keep in mind that this isn’t a judgement call - this is a rule. When 2 mins hit, you must call out “Get It In!” and the team must keep the ball in the box until the game ends or the score is tied. Remember, if it is a tied game, no one must keep it in. Only when one team is ahead must they keep it in.

 

A few reminders and helpful suggestions. When a stalling warning/under 2 mins and the ball goes out of bounds with the offensive team retaining possession, be sure to remind them often that they have 10 seconds to get it in and then must keep it in. When you say it often and loud enough for everyone to hear, coaches know you made they players aware and appreciate it.

 

--
Joe Perez
IHSA Football (R), Lacrosse (R) and Soccer (C) official (53117)
USA Hockey Level IV official/Hockey Canada Level VI official
USSF Grade 7 official and Assessor
US Lacrosse COC (MCLA/NCAA) certified official


 

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Tip of the Week 5/2:

One rule that is quite easy to mix up is goalie interference. The rule states that the goaltender has special privileges when in the crease. He may not be contacted or body checked at any time while he has at least one foot in the crease. Once he exits the crease area, he is another field player without special privileges. One of the privileges is his stick may not be contacted at any time while it is in the cylinder of the crease as well as any time the goalie has possession (keep in mind, possession is defined as being able to make a pass or take a shot). 

When the ball is loose outside of the crease, the goalie may have his stick checked provided he does not:

1) Have possession of the ball
2) Have the part of the crosse being checked within the cylinder of the crease

When the goalie has the ball clamped outside the crease, the field players may contact the part of the crosse outside the crease area but once it is retracted, the contact must stop or goaltender interference will be the call.

So remember, if the ball is possessed or in the crease, chances are, you can't touch the goal or his stick. If is outside the crease, you can make a play!

--
Joe Perez
IHSA Football (R), Lacrosse (R) and Soccer (C) official (53117)
USA Hockey Level IV official/Hockey Canada Level VI official
USSF Grade 7 official and Assessor
US Lacrosse COC (MCLA/NCAA) certified official






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